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solid bodied electric ukulele

Here’s one that eventually may become of interest to the internet in the broad scale.

I went to the city’s large guitar & musical instrument emporium with my associate A—-, who is crazy about ukuleles. My obsession with guitars comes and goes, but he plays and thinks about ukuleles all the time. And, as I am told, electric ukuleles in the style of a solid-bodied electric guitar are as scarce as hens teeth. Apparently, occasionally a person with luthier skills here or there makes one but they all have an odd look to them.

One of the few Korean guitar companies in Korea that still makes their stuff in Korea had a crack at it and branded them as Tomo. They use a specially made single coil pick-up, and the thin four strings from a normal electric guitar, although, it seems that the tuning still stays in the standard uke tuning. A—- was attempting to tune it to D,G,B,E but trying to get to the G felt like it was going to break the string. It might’ve got there if he’d forced it but who knows with such a short length of wire. Some of the bodies were made with alder and some with mahogany.

Electric ukulele purchasing expedition

They had a tele style, a strat style and a Gibson body-shape style. The pick-guards on the fender styles were apparently quite cheap-looking and maybe would benefit from a reseating and some filing of the edges. This was part of the reason why A—- finally went with the Gibson-style uke. It was a yellow colour that’s a bit brighter than the normal gibson ‘TV yellow’. Cash price W400 000. We’re sure these would sell bigtime if they were in N.America, especially considering how the hipster demographic has started to latch on to the ukulele.

, , , — YS @ 11:44 am, April 29, 2012

this looks

If you’re interested in Korean affairs, then you might have heard about the sinking of the navy boat cheonan a couple of months back. I admit that I found it fairly easy to assume that it was north korea who dunnit, but then I also am aware of south korean peoples’ child-like tendency to fuck things up, not to mention the fact that we’re talking about a branch of an armed forces—that is, we all make boo-boos but when people with explosives do, we tend to hear about it.

My end conclusion was, yeah it probably was the N.koreans, but the s.koreans fudged their investigation, and rather than admit that, they started making shit up to make it look how they wanted.   Again, I’ve seen minor versions of this chain of events and behavioural tendency in general life here.

imgres

No joke, I’ve walked past portrait shops where they show examples of their work in the window, large hang-on-yer-wall things of a family that get all dressed up in their best clothes, get the photo, then have it photo-shopped (badly, I might add) onto the background of someone else’s livingroom.

What I’m eventually getting to is this 20min doco, which actually goes a step further and kind of sums it up as the Korean navy and ruling govt party as actively covering up their incompetence and pointing to n.korea as the boogeyman.

Interesting doco, and good of them to make the effort to do it in English.

I’m no defender of n.korea – not in the slightest, but no one likes being lied to.

, , , , — YS @ 4:30 pm, November 15, 2010

aussie_grit

This year and last my more leisurely work schedule has enable me to get back into watching the formula one car racing. I guess I’ve watched it off and on since I was a kid. Here in Korea the best way to watch it is as a downloaded torrent. There’s one chap who’s known as tdmk who uploads the file and then it spreads pretty quickly. I get to watch it about a day after it’s fun. So, big thanks to him, and to the BBC who provide the coverage. They do a pretty good job with the reportage pre and post race, certainly much better than what I remember of channel 10 in australia.

It’s sport and drama rolled into one. All the different egos and personalities clashing and reacting with each other. I think last year I was just happy to see a close title fight and wasn’t barracking for any driver in particular. This year, despite my better judgement, I’ve been caught up in Mark Webber fever! I really hope he wins the world driver’s championship. Partly because he’s australian, but also because he seems to be getting a slightly raw deal within the red bull team. I always go for the underdog. I say better judgement, because last year, and at times this year, he’s reminded me of barracking for the Geelong Football Club—at least—a few years back, they would show such amazing potential, then snatch defeat out of the jaws of victory. But Mark has a very Australian personality and it comes through in the interviews. Also, he has this near-permanent 5 o’clock shadow and angular face which makes him look like a computer game character.

markwebber

Other drivers I’m liking this year are: Robert Kubica of Poland; he’ll definitely rise to the top in the next few years. And Heikki Kovelinan, the Finn who’s with the Lotus team this year.

Anyway, F1 is coming to S.korea for the first time this year and me and j-e, my girlfriend are going. It’s in two weeks. I’m hoping it’ll be really worth it.

, , , , , — YS @ 3:52 pm, October 11, 2010

south korea, internet, google, you-tube, FREEDOM

I don’t usually bother dabbling in polotics these days but this is interesting. I was a little puzzled the other days when I couldn’t leave a biting comment on you-tube about an effects pedal the other day. Firefox throws down a little box saying comments have been disabled because of blahblah real name policy. I thought this would mean that I’d have to go to some dumb korean website to sign up with my name just so I could troll youtoob.

But after reading this article on the hankoryeah I see that google central has shut down comments and uplaods to you-tube from within S.Korea, because fascist government policy here goes against their belief that people should be able to be anonymous on the internet. Right on. About time google did something I agree with. The article finished with this:

Jeon Eung-whi, a standing member of Green Consumers Network in Korea, said, “This affair has given an impression to the world that ‘South Korea is an advanced nation in terms of technology, however, is a backwards nation in terms of freedom.

, , , , — YS @ 2:24 pm, April 15, 2009

Commentating, illustrating, description giving: Sunny Breaks.


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